Surgical Procedures


 

Surgery

Elective and Non-Elective Surgeries

The doctors at the Cedarburg Veterinary Clinic complete surgical procedures 5 days a week in our well-equipped operating suite complete with modern monitoring devices.  A physical exam is completed and preanesthetic blood work is evaluated prior to the procedures to help determine your pet's health status before anesthesia.  To ensure the best care possible, a certified veterinary technician closely monitors patients during surgery and keeps them comfortable during recovery.  Surgical services we offer range from routine procedures such as spays, neuters, laser declawing, dewclaw removal, and lump removals, to more involved procedures like Cesarian Sections, bladder stone removal and ACL Repair.  For most surgeries, doctors can use the laser versus scalpel blade for incisions.  In order to decrease the risk of passing infectious diseases, all hospitalized patients are required to have proper vaccinations (cats require FVRCP, and dogs require Distemper, Bordetella and Rabies vaccination).

Laser Surgery

For your pet’s surgery, we offer the option of using the surgical laser as a replacement of a scalpel blade for most surgeries.  When the doctor uses the laser to make incisions, sealing to the nerves and blood vessels occur which results in decreased pain, bleeding and inflammation.  Less pain means a quicker recovery time for your companion.


Dog Neuter

Neuter or castration is a surgical procedure in which both testicles are removed under general anesthesia with sterile operating technique. This surgery eliminates the sex drive and the ability to reproduce. It is also helpful in diminishing objectionable behavior such as roaming, aggression, and urine marking. In the older dog castration is often necessary due to diseases of the testicles or prostate, which can be prevented if the surgery is done at an early age.

The morning of your pet’s surgery, you and your pet will meet with the veterinarian performing surgery. At this appointment, your pet will receive a complete physical exam, and the veterinarian can answer any questions you may have. Following the exam, a blood screening is completed to help evaluate your pet’s health status before anesthesia.

The operation is performed under general anesthesia. The testicles are removed through a small incision made in front of the scrotum. Dogs that are neutered typically stay overnight at the clinic* to help limit their activity, then receive a physical exam the following morning. A veterinary technician will review postoperative care when you pick up your pet.

Post-operative Care

Care after surgery is very important for your pet’s health. For at least 7 days following surgery, keep your pets activity at a minimum with leash walking and/or crate rest only. Do not allow your pet to go swimming, do not bathe your pet, and do not allow your pet to lick at his incision. Pets that lick at their incision increase their risk of opening the incision and causing an infection, so an Elizabethan Collar (or cone collar) may need to be applied. Check the incision several times daily for any discharge, redness, bleeding or swelling, and call the clinic if any of these occur. If your pet seems depressed, lethargic, anorexic or ill in any way, call the clinic immediately. If you have any questions about your pet’s health or the surgery, please call.


Cat Neuter

Neuter, or castration, is a surgical procedure in which both testicles are removed under general anesthesia with sterile operating technique. When castration is performed before sexual maturity it reduces the sex instincts. This tends to eliminate fighting, night prowling and urine spraying, and decrease the odor of urine, which are common to the intact male cat. Castration of sexually mature cats is helpful in reducing these problems, but may not entirely eliminate established behavior patterns.

The morning your pet’s surgery is scheduled, you and your pet will meet with the veterinarian performing surgery. At this appointment, your pet will receive a complete physical exam, and the veterinarian can answer any questions you may have. Following the exam, a blood screening is completed to help further evaluate your pet’s health prior to anesthesia.

The operation is performed under general anesthesia. The testicles are removed through two small incisions made in the scrotum. Cats that are neutered usually stay overnight at the clinic* to help limit activity, then receive an exam the following morning. A veterinary technician will review postoperative care instructions when you pick up your pet.

Post-operative Care

Caring for your pet after surgery is a very important task. For at least 7 days following surgery, keep your pet indoors only and keep their activity limited. Do not allow your pet to lick at his incisions. Pets that lick at their incisions increase their risk of opening the incisions and causing an infection, so an Elizabethan Collar (or cone collar) may need to be applied. Check the incisions several times daily for any discharge, redness, bleeding or swelling, and call the clinic if any of these occur. If your pet seems depressed, lethargic, anorexic or ill in any way, call the clinic immediately. If you have any questions about your pet’s health or the surgery, please call.


Dog Spay

Ovariohysterectomy is the medical term for “spaying” the female animal. The surgical procedure consists of the complete removal of both ovaries and the uterus. This surgery eliminates “heat” periods, and prevents pregnancy, uterine infections, ovarian and uterine tumors, and decreases the chance of mammary (breast) tumors.

The morning your pet’s surgery is scheduled, you and your pet will meet with the veterinarian performing surgery. At this appointment, your pet will receive a complete physical exam, and the veterinarian can answer any questions you may have. Following the exam, a blood screening is completed to help further evaluate your pet’s health before anesthesia.

Although it is a commonly performed procedure, ovariohysterectomy of the dog is a major abdominal surgery involving a general anesthetic and sterile operating technique. Dogs that undergo a spay surgery stay overnight at the clinic* to help limit activity, and a physical exam is completed the morning following surgery. A veterinary technician will review postoperative care instructions with you when you pick up your pet.

Postoperative Care

Caring for your dog after her ovariohysterectomy is a very important job. For 10-14 days following surgery, it is imperative that your pet stays calm, meaning leash walking only, and no running, jumping, or playing. Your pet should not be allowed to go swimming, should not be bathed, and should not be allowed to lick at her incision. Pets that lick at their incision increase their risk of opening the incision and causing an infection, so an Elizabethan Collar (or cone collar) may need to be applied. Check the incision several times daily for any discharge, redness, bleeding, swelling or damage to the incision, and call the clinic if any of these occur. If your pet seems depressed, lethargic, anorexic or ill in any way, call the clinic immediately. Your pet’s incision will have sutures that need to be removed in 10-14 days; please make an appointment for this. If you have any questions about your pet’s health or the surgery, please call.


Cat Spay

Ovariohysterectomy is the medical term for “spaying” of the female animal. The surgical procedure consists of the complete removal of both ovaries and the uterus. This surgery eliminates “heat” periods, prevents pregnancy, uterine infections and reduces the chance of breast cancer. Ovariohysterectomy is a necessary procedure in the treatment of certain diseases such as uterine infections, ovarian and uterine tumors.

The morning your pet’s surgery is scheduled, you and your pet will meet with the veterinarian performing surgery. At this appointment, your pet will receive a complete physical exam, and the veterinarian can answer any questions you may have. Following the exam, a blood screening is completed to help further evaluate your pet’s health.

Although it is a commonly performed procedure, ovariohysterectomy of the cat is a major abdominal surgery involving a general anesthetic and sterile operating technique. Cats that undergo a spay surgery stay overnight at the clinic* to help limit activity, and a physical exam is completed the morning following surgery.

Postoperative Care

Caring for your cat after her ovariohysterectomy is a very important job. For 10-14 days following surgery, it is imperative that your pet stays calm, meaning no running, jumping, or playing, and she should stay indoors only. Your pet should not be bathed and should not be allowed to lick at her incision. Pets that lick at their incision increase their risk of opening the incision and causing an infection, so an Elizabethan Collar (or cone collar) may need to be applied. Check the incision several times daily for any discharge, redness, bleeding, swelling, or damage to the incision, and call the clinic if any of these occur. If your pet seems depressed, lethargic, anorexic or ill in any way, call the clinic immediately. If you have any questions about your pet’s health or the surgery, please call.


Dentistry

Since pets need dental care too, we provide dental services for the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease. Our professional dental procedures may include ultrasonic scaling, polishing, fluoride treatment, Oravet™ application, extractions, epulis removal, and more. A physical exam is completed and preanesthetic bloodwork is evaluated prior to the procedures to help determine your pet’s health status before anesthesia. We team with each individual owner and patient and find the best ways to prevent dental disease from progressing, which can involve brushing the teeth, offering dental specific treats or food, and dental rinses.

Dental Radiographs

Dental radiographs, or x-rays, are very important in diagnosing periodontal problems because approximately 60% of your pet’s tooth structure is hidden below the gum line. A dental radiograph is produced using a small film that is placed strategically in the mouth of an anesthetized pet, and our hand held x-ray unit is positioned with appropriate technique in order to isolate a particular tooth or set of teeth. Full mouth dental radiographs are recommended when a pet is undergoing a dental procedure, even if the teeth appear healthy above the gum line. We can even use these small films to photograph the paw of a dog or cat, or the body of a small rodent.


Declawing

Declawing or (onychectomy) is the surgical removal of the nail, nail bed and entire first bone on each toe. Declawing can be performed if cats are exhibiting destructive behavior, are causing injury to the owner or other humans, or if the nails have trauma or nail bed infection. This procedure is usually performed at the same time the cat is spayed or neutered which is normally around 6 months of age, however it can be done later in the cats life. It is typical for younger cats to handle the surgery better than older felines. Complications with declaw surgeries include bleeding after surgery, persistent lameness, claw re-growth (if the bone is not completely removed), and longer healing time in older patients and/or heavier patients.

The morning your pet’s surgery is scheduled, you and your pet will meet with the veterinarian performing surgery. At this appointment, your pet will receive a complete physical exam, and the veterinarian can answer any questions you may have. Following the exam, a blood screening is completed to further evaluate your pet’s health. Declawing is performed under general anesthesia using a surgical laser which decreases bleeding and pain. Patients are hospitalized for 2 nights* in order to reduce activity which aids in the healing process, and also allows doctors and technicians to monitor for licking and signs of infection. A veterinary technician will review postoperative care instructions with you when you pick up your pet.

Postoperative Care

Following the home care instructions provided to you after surgery is imperative for your cat’s recovery. For 10-14 days following surgery, your pet should not be allowed to jump from any surfaces, participate in play activity, receive a bath, venture outdoors, or lick/chew at the paws. Pets that lick or chew at their incisions increase their risk of opening the incisions and causing an infection, so an Elizabethan Collar (or cone collar) may need to be applied. Special litter (Yesterday’s News) should be used for the first week following surgery, since regular litter is too dusty and may cause infection by getting caught in the incisions. Check the incisions daily for any discharge, redness, bleeding, swelling, or damage to the incisions, and call the clinic if these occur. If your pet seems depressed, lethargic, anorexic or ill in any way, call the clinic immediately. If you have any questions about your pet’s health or the surgery, please call.

*Staff is not present at the clinic after normal business hours. 24 hours supervision is available at emergency or referral centers. A signed release form is required if you choose to decline overnight stay. Please speak with your pet’s veterinarian if you have questions regarding clinic policy.